10 Yogasanas that are practiced while sitting with picture

  • By Ravi Shankar Upadhyay
  • at November 13, 2023 -
  • 0 comments

list of yogasanas (yoga postures) that are often practiced while sitting, along with a brief description. Please note that it's important to practice yoga under the guidance of a qualified instructor, especially if you are a beginner. Additionally, for a comprehensive understanding of each asana, it is recommended to refer to instructional books, videos, or attend yoga classes.


1. Sukhasana (Easy Pose):




Sukhasana, commonly known as the Easy Pose, is a basic seated yoga posture. Here's how you can practice Sukhasana:

  1. Sit on the Floor:

    • Find a quiet and comfortable place to sit on the floor or on a yoga mat.
    • Cross your legs, bringing your right shin in front of the left one.
  2. Align Your Body:

    • Sit with your spine straight, and align your head, neck, and spine.
    • Place your hands on your knees with palms facing up or down.
  3. Position of Hands:

    • You can use a specific hand mudra by placing the thumb and index finger together in a circle (gyana mudra) or rest your hands on your knees.
  4. Crossed Legs:

    • Your knees should be wide, and each foot should be under the opposite knee.
  5. Grounding:

    • Root your sitting bones into the floor to feel grounded and stable.
  6. Relax Your Shoulders:

    • Relax your shoulders, and let them fall away from your ears.
  7. Chin Parallel to the Floor:

    • Keep your chin parallel to the floor, and gaze straight ahead.
  8. Breathing:

    • Breathe naturally and gently. You can incorporate deep, mindful breaths to enhance relaxation.
  9. Duration:

    • Sit in Sukhasana for as long as comfortable, gradually increasing the duration as your flexibility and comfort level improve.

Sukhasana is a beginner-friendly pose that helps open up the hips, lengthen the spine, and promote a sense of calm and groundedness. It's often used as a starting point for meditation and pranayama (breath control) practices. If you have any physical limitations or health concerns, it's advisable to consult with a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting new yoga poses.

2. Padmasana (Lotus Pose):



Padmasana, also known as Lotus Pose, is a classic seated yoga pose that is commonly used for meditation and pranayama (breath control) practices. The name "Padmasana" is derived from the Sanskrit words "Padma," meaning lotus, and "asana," meaning pose or seat. The pose is called Lotus Pose because the legs, when crossed, resemble the petals of a lotus flower.

Here's how you can practice Padmasana:

  1. **Start in a comfortable seated position on the floor or on a yoga mat with your legs extended.

  2. **Bend your right knee and bring your right foot toward your left hip, allowing the sole of your right foot to face upward.

  3. **Similarly, bend your left knee and bring your left foot toward your right hip, so that both knees are resting on the ground.

  4. **Keep your spine straight and your head aligned with your spine. Your shoulders should be relaxed.

  5. **Rest your hands on your knees, with your palms facing up and your thumb and index finger touching (in Chin Mudra) or place your hands on your knees in Jnana Mudra (index finger and thumb touching).

  6. **Engage your core muscles and find a comfortable position where you feel grounded and stable.

  7. **Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Hold the pose for as long as you feel comfortable.

Padmasana is known for its benefits in meditation as it promotes a sense of calmness and inner peace. However, it may not be suitable for everyone, especially those with knee or hip issues. If you experience discomfort or pain, consider using props or practicing alternative seated poses that are more accessible for your body.

It's important to approach yoga poses mindfully and listen to your body. If you're new to yoga or have any health concerns, it's advisable to consult with a qualified yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting advanced poses like Padmasana.

3. Vajrasana (Thunderbolt Pose):


Vajrasana, also known as the Thunderbolt Pose, is a yoga asana that involves sitting on your heels with your knees bent and your big toes touching. It is a simple but powerful pose that has various benefits for the body and mind. Here's how you can practice Vajrasana:

Steps to Practice Vajrasana:

  1. Start in a Kneeling Position: Begin by kneeling on the floor. Keep your knees close together.

  2. Sit Back: Sit back on your heels. Your buttocks should rest on your heels.

  3. Keep Your Spine Straight: Ensure that your spine is straight. You can place your hands on your knees or thighs with palms facing down.

  4. Place Your Hands: Rest your hands on your knees or thighs, with palms facing down. You can use the traditional mudra by placing your hands on your knees with your index fingers touching your thumbs.

  5. Relax Your Shoulders: Keep your shoulders relaxed and away from your ears.

  6. Gaze Forward: Keep your gaze forward with your eyes open or closed, depending on your comfort.

  7. Breathe Mindfully: Focus on your breath. Breathe naturally and deeply. This pose is often used for meditation and pranayama (breath control) practices.

Benefits of Vajrasana:

  1. Improves Digestion: Vajrasana helps in improving digestion by increasing blood flow to the abdominal area and enhancing the functioning of the digestive organs.

  2. Strengthens the Back: The pose helps in strengthening the muscles of the thighs and the lower back.

  3. Relieves Sciatica Pain: Regular practice of Vajrasana can be beneficial for individuals suffering from sciatica pain.

  4. Reduces Indigestion and Gas: It is known to be effective in reducing indigestion, gas, and acidity.

  5. Improves Concentration: Practicing Vajrasana regularly can help improve concentration and focus, making it a good preparatory pose for meditation.

  6. Stimulates Vajra Nadi: According to yogic philosophy, Vajrasana stimulates the Vajra Nadi, which is believed to be associated with vitality and energy flow in the body.

Precautions:

  1. If you have knee or ankle issues, consult a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting Vajrasana.

  2. Pregnant women should avoid prolonged periods in this pose.

  3. Individuals with severe back problems or recent surgery should also approach this pose with caution.

As with any yoga pose, it's essential to listen to your body, practice within your limits, and consult a qualified yoga instructor or healthcare professional if you have any concerns or pre-existing conditions.

4. Baddha Konasana (Bound Angle Pose):

Baddha Konasana, commonly known as Bound Angle Pose or Cobbler's Pose, is a seated yoga asana that is often practiced to open the hips and groins. Here's how you can do it:

Instructions:

Starting Position:

Begin by sitting on the floor with your legs extended in front of you.
Bend your knees and bring the soles of your feet together, allowing your knees to drop out to the sides.

Foot Placement:

Hold your feet with your hands. You can interlace your fingers around your feet to create a "bound" position.

Posture:

Sit up tall with your spine straight. Engage your core muscles to support your back.
Gently press your knees towards the floor using the elbows, but avoid forcing them down. Allow your hips to open gradually.

Breathing:

Take deep breaths, inhaling and exhaling slowly. This helps to relax your body and deepen the stretch.

Duration:

Hold the pose for 30 seconds to 1 minute, gradually increasing the duration as you become more comfortable in the pose.

Release:

To release, gently let go of your feet and extend your legs in front of you.

Benefits:

  • Stretches and opens the hips, inner thighs, and groins.
  • Helps improve flexibility in the knees and ankles.
  • Stimulates abdominal organs, bladder, and kidneys.
  • Therapeutic for sciatica and mild depression.
  • Can be helpful during childbirth to open the pelvic area.

Precautions and Tips:

If you have a knee injury or discomfort, support your knees with cushions or props.
Avoid forcing your knees towards the floor; let them open naturally over time.
If you have a hip or back injury, consult with a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting this pose.

Always listen to your body, and if you feel any pain (especially in the knees), ease out of the pose. It's essential to approach yoga poses with mindfulness and respect for your body's limitations. If you're new to yoga or have any health concerns, it's advisable to consult with a qualified yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting new poses.


5. Ardha Padmasana (Half Lotus Pose):

Ardha Padmasana, or Half Lotus Pose, is a seated yoga posture that is a variation of the full Lotus Pose (Padmasana). In Ardha Padmasana, one foot is placed on the opposite thigh, while the other foot is positioned beneath the opposite leg.

Here's how you can practice Ardha Padmasana:

  1. Sit on the floor: Begin in a comfortable seated position on the floor or on a yoga mat. Ensure that your spine is straight and your shoulders are relaxed.

  2. Bring one foot to the opposite thigh: Lift one foot and place it on the thigh of the opposite leg. The sole of the foot should be facing upward, and the heel should be close to the abdomen.

  3. Place the other foot beneath the opposite leg: The other foot is tucked underneath the opposite leg, with the top of the foot resting on the floor. The knee of the bent leg should point forward.

  4. Align the knees: Ideally, the knee of the raised leg should be close to the floor, and both knees should be in contact with the mat.

  5. Hands-on the knees or in a mudra: You can place your hands on your knees with palms facing down or adopt a mudra (hand gesture) for meditation. A common mudra is to touch the thumb and index finger, with the other three fingers extended.

  6. Lengthen your spine: Keep your spine straight and elongated. Engage your core muscles and relax your shoulders.

  7. Gaze forward or close your eyes: Choose a focal point to gaze at, or if you are comfortable, close your eyes and turn your attention inward.

  8. Breathe deeply and mindfully: Take slow, deep breaths, focusing on each inhalation and exhalation. Allow your mind to settle and find a sense of calm.

It's important to note that Ardha Padmasana requires flexibility in the hips and knees. If you experience discomfort or strain, you can use props like cushions or blocks to support your knees and make the pose more accessible. Always listen to your body, and if you have any pre-existing injuries or conditions, consult with a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting new poses.

6. Gomukhasana (Cow Face Pose):


Gomukhasana, also known as Cow Face Pose, is a yoga asana that involves stretching and opening the shoulders and chest. Here's how you can practice Gomukhasana:

  1. Start in a seated position:

    • Sit on the floor with your legs extended straight in front of you.
  2. Bend your knees:

    • Bend your knees and bring your feet to the floor.
  3. Cross your legs:

    • Slide your left foot under your right knee to the outside of your right hip. Then, cross your right leg over your left, bringing your right foot to the outside of your left hip.
  4. Align your knees:

    • Try to align the center of your left knee with the center of your right knee.
  5. Sit evenly:

    • Sit evenly on your sitting bones. If your hips are tight, you can sit on a blanket or a cushion to make it more comfortable.
  6. Extend your arms:

    • Raise your right arm and bring it parallel to the ground, then bend your elbow and reach your hand down your back, between your shoulder blades.
  7. Bring your left arm:

    • Extend your left arm out to the side, then bend the elbow and reach the hand up your back, trying to clasp your fingers together. If your fingers don't reach, you can use a strap or hold onto a towel with both hands.
  8. Open your chest:

    • Lift your chest and open your shoulders as you gently pull your hands in opposite directions. Keep your spine long and your neck in a neutral position.
  9. Hold the pose:

    • Hold the pose for 30 seconds to 1 minute, breathing deeply and maintaining a steady and comfortable breath.
  10. Release and switch sides:

    • Release your hands and uncross your legs. Shake out your legs if needed, then switch the cross of your legs and repeat the pose on the other side.

Benefits of Gomukhasana:

  • Stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles.
  • Opens the chest and shoulders.
  • Improves posture.
  • Alleviates stiffness in the back.
  • Helps in reducing stress and anxiety.

Note: If you have any existing health conditions, it's advisable to consult with a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting new yoga poses. They can provide guidance based on your individual needs and limitations.


7. Marjarasana (Cat Pose):

Marjariasana, commonly known as Cat Pose, is a popular yoga asana that is often included in various yoga sequences. It is a simple yet effective pose that is part of the warm-up and flexibility-building poses in yoga. Here's how you can perform Marjariasana:


Steps:


Starting Position:


Begin on your hands and knees in a tabletop position. Ensure that your wrists are directly under your shoulders and your knees are directly under your hips.

Alignment:


Keep your spine in a neutral position, with a flat back.

Inhale:


Inhale as you arch your back, dropping your belly towards the floor. Lift your head and tailbone towards the ceiling, creating a concave curve in your spine.

Exhale:


Exhale as you round your back, tucking your chin towards your chest. Imagine pulling your belly button towards your spine to create a convex curve in your back.

Repeat:


Continue flowing between the arched and rounded positions, syncing your breath with the movements. Inhale for the arch, and exhale for the round.

Duration:


Repeat this sequence for about 1-3 minutes, depending on your comfort and fitness level.

Benefits:


Flexibility: Marjariasana helps improve flexibility in the spine, neck, and shoulders.


Stress Relief: The rhythmic breathing and movement can help calm the mind and reduce stress.


Core Activation: This pose engages and strengthens the abdominal muscles.


Warm-up: It serves as a good warm-up for the spine before engaging in more intense yoga poses.


Digestive Massage: The movement of the spine in this pose can provide a gentle massage to the abdominal organs, promoting digestion.


Tips:


  • Ensure that your movements are slow and controlled.
  • Pay attention to your breath, and let it guide the pace of your movements.
  • If you have wrist issues, you can use a yoga mat or place a blanket under your wrists for support.
  • It's essential to listen to your body and avoid any movements that cause pain.


Marjariasana is a versatile pose that can be modified to suit different levels of flexibility and fitness. It's often paired with Cow Pose (Bitilasana) to create a flowing sequence, helping to warm up the spine and prepare the body for further yoga practice


8. Balasana (Child’s Pose):


Balasana, also known as Child's Pose, is a yoga pose that is often used for relaxation and restoration. Here's how you can practice Balasana:

  1. Starting Position:

    • Begin by kneeling on the yoga mat with your big toes touching and knees spread apart. You can also keep your knees together if that feels more comfortable.
  2. Sitting Back:

    • Sit back on your heels, allowing your hips to sink towards your heels.
  3. Forward Bend:

    • Hinge at your hips and bend forward, bringing your torso between your thighs.
  4. Arm Position:

    • Extend your arms in front of you or alongside your body with your palms facing down. You can also bring your arms back beside your thighs with your palms facing up. Choose a position that feels comfortable for you.
  5. Head Placement:

    • Rest your forehead on the mat. If it doesn't reach the mat, you can place a cushion or block under your forehead for support.
  6. Breathing:

    • Breathe deeply and relax in this pose. Focus on the breath and allow your body to surrender to the stretch.
  7. Duration:

    • Hold the pose for as long as feels comfortable. It's a restorative pose, so you can stay in it for an extended period if you wish.

Benefits of Balasana:

  • Relaxation: Balasana is a restful pose that promotes a sense of calm and relaxation.
  • Gentle Stretch: It gently stretches the hips, thighs, and ankles.
  • Stress Relief: The forward bend can help release tension in the back, neck, and shoulders, making it a great pose for stress relief.
  • Digestive Aid: This pose can also help massage and stimulate the internal organs, aiding digestion.

Contraindications:

  • Avoid this pose if you have knee injuries. You can use a cushion or blanket under your knees for support.
  • Pregnant individuals should practice this pose with their knees apart to accommodate the belly.

As with any yoga pose, it's essential to listen to your body and modify the pose as needed based on your individual flexibility and comfort level. If you have any existing health concerns or conditions, it's advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or a qualified yoga instructor before attempting new poses..

9. Ardha Matsyendrasana (Half Lord of the Fishes Pose):



Ardha Matsyendrasana, also known as Half Lord of the Fishes Pose, is a seated yoga pose that involves a twist. Here are the steps to perform Ardha Matsyendrasana:

  1. Starting Position:

    • Begin by sitting on the floor with your legs extended straight in front of you.
    • Bend your knees and place your feet on the floor, close to your hips.
  2. Setting Up the Posture:

    • Slide your left foot under your right leg to the outside of your right hip. The outside of your left leg should be on the floor.
    • Bring your right foot to the outside of your left knee, placing it on the floor. Your right knee should point straight up.
  3. Body Positioning:

    • Inhale and lengthen your spine.
    • Exhale and twist your torso to the right. Place your left elbow on the outside of your right knee, with your forearm pointing up.
  4. Hand Placement:

    • Bring your right hand behind you, close to your lower back, fingers pointing away from your body.
    • Use your right hand to support your spine and keep your back straight.
  5. Gaze and Neck:

    • Turn your head to the right, looking over your right shoulder.
    • Keep your neck aligned with your spine.
  6. Hold the Pose:

    • Hold the pose for 20-30 seconds, breathing deeply.
    • Inhale to lengthen the spine, and exhale to deepen the twist.
  7. Release and Repeat:

    • Inhale to release the twist.
    • Repeat the pose on the other side, switching the position of your legs.

Benefits:

  • Ardha Matsyendrasana stretches the spine, shoulders, and hips.
  • It stimulates the digestive organs, improving digestion.
  • The twisting motion helps to detoxify the organs and can be beneficial for the liver and kidneys.
  • It also helps to relieve tension in the back muscles and can be therapeutic for mild backaches.

Precautions:

  • If you have a spinal disc injury or any other back issues, consult with a yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting this pose.
  • Avoid this pose if you have a recent or chronic injury to the hips, knees, or shoulders.
  • Always listen to your body and avoid over-twisting.

As with any yoga pose, it's advisable to practice under the guidance of a qualified yoga instructor, especially if you're a beginner or if you have any existing health concerns.

10. Siddhasana (Adept Pose):



Siddhasana, also known as the Adept Pose, is a seated yoga pose that is commonly used for meditation and pranayama (breath control) practices. The word "Siddhasana" is derived from two Sanskrit words: "Siddha," meaning accomplished or adept, and "asana," meaning posture. This pose is considered one of the classical yoga asanas and is often recommended for meditation due to its grounding and stabilizing effects.

Here's how you can practice Siddhasana:

  1. Start in a seated position: Begin by sitting on the floor with your legs extended straight in front of you.

  2. Bend the left leg: Bring the left heel to the perineum, the soft tissue between the anus and the genitals. You can place the heel against the pubic bone or into the space between the genitals and the anus, depending on your flexibility.

  3. Place the right foot: Bring the right foot over the left thigh. The outer edge of the right foot can rest on the floor or be tucked into the crease of the left hip, depending on your flexibility. The right knee points toward the left.

  4. Alignment of the spine: Ensure that your spine is straight. You can imagine a string pulling you up from the crown of your head. This helps maintain an erect and aligned posture.

  5. Hand placement: Rest your hands on your knees or in the classic mudra for meditation. The classic mudra involves joining the tips of the thumb and index finger, with the other three fingers extended.

  6. Gaze and breathing: Soften your gaze or close your eyes. Focus on your breath, allowing it to be natural and relaxed. You can practice various meditation techniques while in Siddhasana.

  7. Duration: Hold the pose for a comfortable duration. If you are meditating, you may stay in the pose for an extended period, gradually increasing the time as your practice develops.

It's important to note that Siddhasana may not be suitable for everyone, especially those with knee or hip issues. If you have any pre-existing conditions or concerns, it's advisable to consult with a qualified yoga instructor or healthcare professional before attempting this pose. Additionally, individuals with limited flexibility may find it helpful to use props, such as a cushion or blanket, to support their practice.

Remember, these asanas have various physical and mental benefits, but it's crucial to approach them mindfully and seek guidance to ensure proper alignment and technique. 

Author

Written by Admin

The Author is, a seasoned wellness author, delves into the art of healthy living through his insightful narratives on herbs, lifestyle choices, and yoga asanas. With a passion for holistic well-being, Author's writings inspire readers to embrace a balanced life, fostering happiness and vitality through the integration of natural remedies and mindful practices.

0 comments:

Exercise to Relieve Back Pain: Simple Steps to Feel Better - How Exercise Helps with Back Pain

How Exercise Helps with Back Pain Lots of people have back pain, especially if they sit for a long time. It's really common! But there&#...